Monsters, punk, drama; what more can you expect from Panic! At The Disco

If Adam Lambert and Freddie Mercury had a baby, it would be Panic! At The Disco.  The operatic pop-punk band’s newest album Death of a Bachelor is nothing less than theatrical and dramatic.

This is the first album for Panic! At the Disco since the original drummer and co-founder of the band, Spencer Smith, announced that he was leaving the band last year in 2015.  The group was left with lead singer Brendon Urie, bass guitarist Dallon Weekes, and a new guitarist and drummer, Kenneth Harris and Daniel Pawlovich.  With a combination of new and original members of the band, Death of a Bachelor had a lot of expectations, which it exceeded.

From melodramatic, Broadway worthy music videos, to Urie’s spectacular vocals, Death of a Bachelor impresses new fans and entices them from the beginning.  The album begins with the song that it’s named after, bringing you back to the times of Frank Sinatra.  The video is in black and white, with Urie front and center on stage, pouring out classy melodies.  But it’s not all Sinatra, for then there begins a heavy beat in the background, along with a techno feel and Urie hitting the killer high notes, creating a blend of sounds that couldn’t be more perfect.

The later songs in the album really prove Panic’s theatrical talent, especially in Emperor’s New Clothes and Crazy=Genius.  Just by a look at the insane lyrics of the latter of the two songs, it’s clear that Panic is all about dramatics:  “She said at night in my dreams /

You dance on a tightrope of weird / If crazy equals genius / Then I’m a f***ing arsonist /

I’m a rocket scientist.”  Moreover, the music video for Emperor’s New Clothes is like right out of Michael Jackson’s Thriller video: monsters, grave stones, and skeletons.  Oh my!  While Urie is singing about “taking back the crown” and people “watching [him] die,” you see him transform into a demon-thing with horns and fangs—entertainment for the ears and the eyes.

But Panic doesn’t limit itself to the theatrical sound; it can do just about anything.  In Victorious, the band celebrates every little act of kindness or positive thing it does, like helping an old lady cross the street, or not calling your ex.  With comedic lyrics, the sound is totally head-bopping and just a fun pop song that’s easy to listen to.

Despite losing the original drummer of the band, it’s clear that Panic! At the Disco can overcome any obstacle and succeed nonetheless.  Death of a Bachelor is the perfect example of the mini-crisis caused success.

 

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